Wednesday, November 18, 2009

How is Lincoln Hall Going Green?

The newly reopened Lincoln Hall has been renovated to show that stewardship of the environment and energy savings is a top priority at UIC. So what’s different in Lincoln Hall and how is it saving energy? The biggest energy-saving feature is the geothermal system. The Lincoln Hall geothermal system is a method that uses water to heat and cool the air in the building. This is accomplished by pumping water through pipes buried underground (below the open space near University Hall, to be exact). The pipes use the earth’s natural ground temperature, along with heating or cooling assistance from equipment in the building, to maintain a constant temperature of 73? F year round in Lincoln Hall. A geothermal system already in place and running in Grant Hall has seen a 50% decrease of energy consumption since its implementation in the fall of 2007. The aim is to have Lincoln, Grant and Douglas hall running all on the same geothermal system, which was expanded to accommodate all three buildings during the Lincoln Hall renovation. [READ MORE]

Lincoln Hall also features double-pane insulated windows covered by a solar film with a high reflective factor; the film allows the windows to reduce the amount of solar radiation that enters the room. This makes the windows 40% more effective than plain glass. The shades for the windows also increase energy savings by opening or closing with help from solar sensors and a building automation system. The classrooms also contain a variety of features, like whiteboards that contain 50% recycled materials and wood doors certified by the Forest Stewardship Council(FSC. The energy savings don’t stop in the classrooms - they are carried throughout Lincoln Hall. The bathrooms contain low flow and automatic water fixtures along with hand driers instead of paper towels.

The classrooms and the bathrooms, and even the oases, were overhauled. The oases in Lincoln Hall use energy-efficient lighting, ergonomically designed furniture, carpet squares made from recycled content and work stations made with FSC-certified wood veneer. These features, along with the addition of natural linoleum used throughout the building and the native landscaping used outside the building, also contribute to Lincoln Hall’s LEED silver certification.

There are plans to install a photo-voltaic solar system on the roof of Lincoln Hall in hopes of it producing 10% of the building’s electricity. With all these new and exciting changes to Lincoln Hall it has transformed the building into a green haven that students and faculty are[V1] already enjoying. If you haven’t already seen the changes to Lincoln Hall, we encourage you to walk in and around the building, or stop by the Lincoln Hall Grand Reopening on November 19.

10 comments:

wolvespage.yolasite.com said...

Adding a wind turbine could also be very helpful. I Believe they produce more energy then solar, but I may be wrong.

Slava Rybalka said...

Thank you for what you are doing. Your blog is really useful to people.Check my blog, I am writting on a close topic. I am writting about going green tips and way of life.

g[and]g[on]g said...

Some great ideas in this post. What's your opinion of people who say that "going green" is just a fad? I mean, there's the part of it that saves money and what not, but as far as environmental impact, I don't see how it COULDN'T make a difference -- even if ultimately minimal in the grand scheme of things. Anyway, thanks for this post.

-Windows 8

krish said...

Solar energy is really the perfect energy saving resource which can be utilized in many ways like for heating water through solar water heater, solar panels, photovoltaic systems, solar power panels & DIY Solar panels. As the global temperature is rising to save environment utilizing renewable sources of energy is the best way for giving boost to Go Green revolution.

Bill Guandolo said...

Lincoln Hall using a geothermal system to heat and cool the air in the building is fantastic. The solar panels will be good but they won't have the same impact as the geothermal system. Keep pushing the newest ideas continuing to improve the building. Consider better RValue in the flooring and a wind turbine. Going green is not a fad particularly if it reduces operational costs. http://sustainableflooringexpert.blogspot.com/

Forward Focus said...

Solar systems are such a worthy green product. Some places just do not have wind. I would love solar heating in my home to save on underfloor heating. Great blog post.

stean tochle said...

They should have possibility of using aInduction Heater at Linkcoln Hall as well, would greatly reduce electricity costs.

David Geldart said...

I'd be curious to know what type of "energy efficient lighting" has been used. LED technology has improved by leaps and bounds in the past couple of years, but so far people are still put off by the initial costs. When you look at the overall savings and the quality of light, these days quality LED lighting is really a no-brainer if the lights are being used at least 10 hours per day.

Office of Sustainability said...

David -

LEDs were not used in Lincoln Hall. The building uses high-efficiency Compact Fluorescent Lightbulbs (CFLs).

Nick said...

It sounds like the whole building could be self sufficient with just a little more work.